Elizabeth Boyette: Listening With Compassion

Elizabeth Boyette
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“My family is the most important thing to me, so as a mother, I know how important it is to ensure that your estate is organized,” said estate planning attorney Elizabeth Boyette.

She is of counsel at Jackson Law, P.C., where her practice focuses on estate planning, probate, estate administration, and real estate and business representation.

Boyette and her husband, Doug, have two children, Dewey, 4, and Eva James, 3. “We do have an estate plan. We’re not cobbler’s kids who don’t have shoes,” she laughed.

That experience with her own family gives Boyette insight into helping clients at a similar point in their lives. “I help guide them through their decision-making process and just relate and talk about the trials and tribulations of parenthood,” said Boyette.

“I really enjoy working with families planning a baby or maybe who have children who are minors discussing what would happen in various scenarios about what makes the best sense for their family circumstances. Having an estate plan makes things easier for those that you care about during difficult transitions.”

Elizabeth Boyette was raised in Kitty Hawk, NC. Her father was a doctor, and her mother worked for the N.C. Division on Aging. It gave her a perspective on the issues families face when thinking long-term. Boyette graduated from UNC with a Bachelor of Arts in international studies and a minor in French. She attended Campbell Law School, where she met her future husband.

A Simple and Selfless Act

Every few years, we hear about somebody famous who died and didn’t leave a will. Aretha Franklin, Prince, and Michael Jackson come to mind. What they did leave behind was expensive messes for their heirs and lawyers to untangle.

“I have seen how failure to plan can create catastrophic situations and messes that people would never want to impose on their unsuspecting family members at death. To me, putting a flexible estate plan in place ahead of time is a simple and selfless act,” said Boyette.

“I think the pandemic has reminded us that anybody can pass away at any time. It’s given people the awareness that they need to come in and get things done. We don’t know what life’s going to bring, so we have to have everything in place even in the best of times.”

Boyette reminds clients to review their estate plans every three to five years and update them to incorporate changes such as new children or grandchildren or the passing of a beneficiary. “I’m not going to know what has happened in your life. You really should come back to me and update me on your family dynamic. Once it’s too late, it’s too late.”

Holistic Solutions

As a member of the Junior League of Raleigh, Trinity Baptist Church, and president of the Wake Women Attorneys, Boyette stays plugged into what is happening in clients’ lives and potential new clients.

“I really enjoy networking organically doing things that I am passionate about. I like meeting people with similar interests who also want to give back to their community. All these organizations provide a philanthropic outlet while also allowing me to connect with like-minded individuals,” explained Boyette.

“I pride myself on being able to listen to my clients’ stories with compassion, learn about their family dynamics, and provide a holistic solution to their situations,” said Boyette.

“Good estate planning and estate administration encompass comprehensive knowledge of business planning, real estate, and taxes. It requires me to connect with people with patience while they consider difficult decisions that impact their loved ones. I love that when people leave their signing appointment, they feel relieved and comforted.”

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