Types of Premises Liability Cases You Can Sue For

Suing for a premises liability case can be tricky, particularly if you are unsure what kind of case you have. If you have been injured on someone else’s property, you may wonder if you have a premises liability case. Here are some of the most common types of premises liability cases.

Elevator and Escalator Accidents

These cases often involve injuries from people falling down the shaft of an elevator or being injured by an escalator. Such accidents occur when the property owner has not adequately maintained the equipment or the elevator or escalator is not up to code.

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When suing for an elevator or escalator accident, it is crucial to prove that the property owner knew or should have known about the dangerous condition and did not take steps to fix it. You should contact a premises liability lawyer to discuss your case if you have been injured in an elevator or escalator accident.

Slip and Fall Accidents

Slip and fall accidents are probably the most common type of premises liability case. They can occur on any property, including wet floors in grocery stores, icy sidewalks, or even in your neighbor’s home. They can lead to serious injuries, including broken bones and head injuries.

If you slip or fall because your shoes or clothing got caught on something, you likely do not have a premises liability case. However, if you slip or fall because of a dangerous condition on the property, you may have a case. For example, if you slip and fall on a wet floor that was not properly marked with a wet floor sign, the store owner may be liable for your injuries.

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Dog Bites

If a dog has bitten you, you may have a premises liability case against the dog’s owner. In most states, dog owners are held strictly liable for any injuries their dog causes—meaning you do not have to prove that the owner knew the dog was dangerous.

The dog bite must have occurred on the owner’s property, and you must have been lawfully on the property at the time. For example, if you were trespassing on someone’s property and were bitten by their dog, you would not have a case.

Defective Property Conditions

If a defective condition on a property injures you, you may have a premises liability case. These cases often involve injuries from falling objects, dangerous stairs, or escalators. If these are not properly maintained, they can endanger people on the property.

Defective conditions can lead to accidents like:

  • Broken bones if you trip on a defective stair
  • A concussion if an object falls on your head
  • Lacerations if you fall through a glass door

Swimming Pool Accidents

You may have a premises liability case if you or your child has been injured in a swimming pool accident. These cases often involve children who climbed into the pool area without the supervision of an adult and drowned.

Amateur swimmers can also be injured in swimming pool accidents. For example, the property owner may be liable if the pool is not properly marked with a depth gauge and you are injured while diving into the pool. However, if you went into the pool area without permission and were injured, you would not have a case.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

If you have been harmed by carbon monoxide poisoning, you may have a premises liability case. These cases often occur in hotels or apartment buildings where the carbon monoxide detectors are not working properly.

Carbon monoxide is a colorless and odorless gas, so it is essential to have working detectors in your home or business. If you do not have working detectors and are injured by carbon monoxide, you may be able to sue the property owner.

Seek Help From a Premises Liability Attorney

While premises liability cases can be complex, an experienced attorney can help you navigate the legal system and get the compensation you deserve. Contact a liability lawyer today to discuss your case if you have been injured on someone else’s property.

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