Stacey Slaughter

Stacey Slaughter: A Leader in the Law

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More than $1 billion. That is the amount attorney Stacey Slaughter has recovered for victims of deceptive or unlawful conduct in complex antitrust; commercial; financial and securities; and consumer class action litigation. She is a partner and member of the executive board at Robins Kaplan LLP. Slaughter also serves on the firm’s advancement, hiring and pro bono committees, and as deputy office managing partner for associate development in the business litigation department.

A standout among her peers, Slaughter has earned many accolades for her tireless leadership. Her most recent achievements include: Twin Cities Business Notable Women in Law; Benchmark Litigation Litigation Star; National Law Journal Elite Women of the Plaintiff ’s Bar; SuperLawyers’ New York Super Lawyer.

Originally an English major with aspirations of being a college professor, Slaughter quickly found that academia failed to satisfy her penchant for debate. “My sense of justice was always driving me,” she said, “so I decided to go to law school at the University of Minnesota. I clerked for two federal judges out of law school. One day in court I saw a young woman attorney argue a meaty and substantial argument in federal court. I thought, Wow, I want to practice at the firm that allowed this woman to do that. It was Robins Kaplan. I applied after my clerkship, and I’ve been practicing here ever since.”

Slaughter describes Robins Kaplan as a place where hard work, creativity and the entrepreneurial spirit are well rewarded. In her early days with the firm, she was given opportunities to experience various aspects of trial practice, and ultimately found her calling in plaintiff ’s litigation. Over the past 20-plus years, opportunities for exploration and professional development have only increased, giving young lawyers from all walks of life the chance to manifest a practice that incorporates their primary interests and skills.

“Our goal is always to make sure that associates are getting the opportunity to grow and develop their craft,” she said. “There are many tools you have to master to practice at a firm like ours. We help guide lawyers in finding out what it is they’re truly passionate about in the practice of law. This is a tough profession — finding that passion is what makes it possible to perform at the highest level. I hear people talk about doing this for the money. I generally think that never can be a sustainable reason for doing anything. You have to know yourself and find your passion to have fulfillment.”

ONLY 25.05 PERCENT

According to the American Bar Association’s 2020 statistics, that is the percentage of the more than 400,000 women lawyers in America who are partners in law firms. Robins Kaplan is committed to eradicating social inequities and ensuring equal opportunities for people of all backgrounds. It succeeds on the belief that its legal advice and advocacy is enhanced by the diversity of its professionals, and you will find women in leadership roles firmwide. In 2020, 50% of the attorneys promoted to partner were from historically underrepresented groups.

In a profession where women role models have been few, Slaughter feels fortunate to have spent her career with a firm that has valued diversity from its inception more than 80 years ago. Early in her journey, a woman partner gave Slaughter a piece of advice she has carried with her ever since. “She said to protect your reputation, to guard it jealously, because that’s ultimately all you have as an attorney.”

Slaughter’s reputation is rock solid as a leader in the law, a friend to the community and a fierce champion of justice. “I feel very fulfilled at this point in my career,” she said. “I’ve worked on some amazing cases and have some amazing stories to tell. Now I have the privilege of transferring that experience to the next generation.”

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