Srinivas Hanumadass

Srinivas Hanumadass on ‘The Come Back’

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on email

CaseyGerry, a San Diego-based personal injury and complex litigation firm, recently promoted Srinivas Hanumadass to partner. Hanumadass concentrates his practice on serious personal injury. Since joining the firm in 2015, he has attained numerous multimillion results and is proactive in the community.

Attorney at Law Magazine sat down with Hanumadass to discuss his promotion and his career.  

AALM: What drew you to CaseyGerry? Tell us a bit about your practice at the firm and your experience working together.

SH: For years, I worked on the defense side on various matters – including employment litigation, environmental construction, and personal injury. In 2013, I had a tragic wrongful death case against CaseyGerry. Over the course of that case, we developed a mutual respect. I think they appreciated how I handled the matter professionally and with sensitivity given the circumstances. About a year after the case was resolved, I caught up with one of the CaseyGerry lawyers I faced and told him I felt I had more passion, heart and soul for injury victims rather than the defendants. To CaseyGerry’s credit, they gave me an opportunity and I have been on the plaintiff’s side since. When I left the defense, my colleagues told me “You are joining the dark side,” but when I told them I was joining CaseyGerry, they said, “but those folks are good!” That made me feel good and I think we still have that reputation bar-wide that instills pride.

AALM: Tell us about your experiences as president of the South Asian Bar Association.

SH: We are a smaller organization than our counterparts, and that requires us to collaborate with sister bar organizations. I have really enjoyed the organization and the camaraderie we have had with everyone. We believe in each other’s values – inclusion, diversity and opportunity – so as president it was nice to be supported and support our friends with their endeavors.

AALM: What compelled you to become involved in association and other community groups?

SH: I think you have a moral obligation as a lawyer to give back and become involved in your community somehow. I have been fortunate to receive an education and I feel compelled to use it for the common good ­– otherwise it has been wasted. The practice of law is also apprenticeship-based. One must pass on what they learn to younger lawyers so they can serve their clients – and ultimately society – best. If I can teach someone something or give them good advice and they use that advice to advance in some way, both of us benefit.

AALM: What are some changes you’re hoping to see implemented in the legal industry?

SH: I have a very specific request that is grounded in reality and achievable. I want to see every managing partner attend all the Diversity Bar dinners. Showing up makes such a difference!

I want to see every managing partner attend all the Diversity Bar dinners. Showing up makes such a difference!

AALM: Tell us about any mentors you’ve worked with through your career and the best advice they shared with you.

SH: I have one piece of life advice I want to share from my high school cross-country coach and one piece of learning advice. My coach would say, “The greatest thing in life is not in never having fallen but in rising up again.” I cherish that statement. The learning advice – the people who read the most books are often the smartest and most aware. Keep reading, keep learning, stay humble.

AALM: How has COVID affected your practice? What changes has it forced you to adopt?

SH: My personal meetings are now all walk and talks throughout Balboa Park, San Diego’s beautiful urban park. It’s a practice I plan on continuing well past the end of the pandemic.

My personal meetings are now all walk and talks throughout Balboa Park

AALM: What are some of your personal career goals? What’s the next milestone you’re looking to achieve?

SH: I would personally like to try 10 or more cases to verdict in the next few years and qualify as a member of the American Board of Trial Advocates. I have the confidence to do it, but I just need the opportunity.

AALM: Tell us a little about your life outside the office.

SH: I am originally from Chicago and my family and I love our hometown sports teams. Ride or die. I love live music and the theatre as well. I am just as excited for clubs and concerts so I can break out my newest dance move, as I am to sit in quiet awe in a dim theatre with great actors performing a smart, funny or thought-provoking play.

AALM: Is there anything else you’d like to add?

SH: Last year I had to take a leave of absence from CaseyGerry due to a serious illness – an experience I feel ultimately made me a better person and a better lawyer. It turned out I have OCD, which is a very misunderstood mental health disorder. The support I received from my work colleagues, family and friends was amazing. I’m speaking about it openly because others who are suffering from any mental condition need to know they are not alone. I now feel like my story is more about the “come back” rather than the leave. I am so fortunate, and I feel very good about that.

I now feel like my story is more about the “come back” rather than the leave. I am so fortunate, and I feel very good about that.

Latest Features

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

X