Why Do I Need a Dana Point Lemon Law Attorney?

cars and trucks entering Dana Point, California
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Consumers ask the California lemon law primary question on a daily basis: “Does my vehicle qualify for a buyback under California lemon law?”

Lemon laws are complicated, so it is best to speak with a skilled Dana Point lemon law attorney for the answers that you need. These are the basics.

Understanding the Ifs in California’s Lemon Law

An experienced Dana Point lemon lawyer should be able to explain the requirements for a consumer to take advantage of vehicle lemon law.

  • If the vehicle has been subjected to an unwarranted number of repair efforts at the authorized warrantor dealer for the same issue/complaint/system. This applies to used vehicles that are covered by the manufacturer’s bumper-to-bumper warranty or extended “power train warranty”, or CPO (Certified pre-Owned).
  • If the vehicle has been in the authorized warranty shop for more than 30 days, it will be considered a loss of warranty parts.
  • If the vehicle has been in the shop for more than 30 days, it will be considered a major issue. This is limited to 18 months and/or 18,000 miles since the original vehicle delivery.
  • If the vehicle’s history shows that the manufacturer (factory), is currently working on a fix/update/software upgrade/solution but doesn’t have one yet.
  • If warranty parts are out of stock, it will take up to 30 days for them to be repaired.
  • If the vehicle is at an authorized dealer, the dealership will inform the customer that the dealership is still waiting for the factory FSE to arrive and offer assistance to warrantor shops due to their inability to diagnose or effect repairs.
  • If the vehicle has been subject to multiple exterior sheet metal panel paint repaints (hood and trunk, doors, bumpers, bumpers, etc.), because of faulty factory paint.
  • If the vehicle has been through multiple repairs with “no problem found”/”operating as intended”/”operating the same as another similar vehicle”, etc., the consumer can easily show the problem and capture it on video.
  • If the vehicle was not disclosed that it was a former rental vehicle, frame/salvage title or flood title,
  • If the vehicle has had 2 or more factory warranty repairs (documented), the customer’s complaint would be considered serious and will likely lead to severe consequences. The California lemon law is the primary question consumers ask on a daily basis. We will try to answer this question here. All the answers are based on the vehicle being covered under a warranty from the manufacturer. These warranties could include a “CPO”, new car warranty, or “power-train” warranty. All of these warranties are FACTORY warranties. NOTE: Some dealers offer extended warranties to consumers as part of their purchase agreements. These warranties are not valid in California and do not count towards repairs under the lemon law.
  • If the vehicle has been subject to an unreasonable number of repair attempts at the authorized warrantor dealer for the same issue/complaint/system. This applies to used vehicles that are covered by the manufacturer’s bumper-to-bumper warranty or extended “powertrain warranty”, or CPO (Certified pre-Owned).
  • If the vehicle has been in the authorized warranty shop for more than 30 days, it will be considered a loss of warranty parts.
  • If the vehicle has been in the shop for more than 30 days, it will be considered a major issue. This is only applicable if the vehicle has been there for at least 18 months (18,000 miles) since the original vehicle delivery.
  • If the vehicle’s history shows that the manufacturer (factory), is currently working on a fix/update/software upgrade/solution but doesn’t have one yet.
  • If warranty parts are out of stock, it will take up to 30 days for them to be repaired.
  • If the vehicle is at an authorized dealer, the dealer is notifying the customer that the dealership is waiting for the factory FSE to arrive to offer assistance to warrantor’s shops due to their inability to diagnose or effect repairs.
  • If the vehicle has been subject to multiple exterior sheet metal panel paint repaints (hood and trunk, doors, doors, bumpers, etc.), Because of faulty factory paint.
  • If the vehicle has been through multiple repairs with “no problem found”/”operating as intended”/”operating the same as another similar vehicle”, etc., the consumer can easily demonstrate the problem and capture it on video.
  • If the vehicle was not disclosed that it was a former rental vehicle, frame/salvage title or flood title,
  • If the vehicle has had 2 or more factory warranty repairs (documented), the customer’s complaint would be considered a defect that, if not addressed under warranty, could lead to serious injury or even death.

Successful Lemon Law Cases

All defects are not created equal. To be considered a lemon in California, a car must be dangerously ill-equipped for its intended purpose. Here are some common defects that have led to successful lemon law claims in California:

  • Warnings about engine lights that are constant or repetitive
  • Steering issues
  • Brake problems
  • Speedometers and fuel gauges that are not working properly
  • Problems with headlights
  • Door locks that are not working properly
  • Failure to begin
  • Air conditioners that are not working properly
  • Acceleration is weakened
  • Battery constantly dying
  • Transmissions that rumble
  • Shoddy paintwork

You owe it to yourself to ensure that your vehicle is covered by the California Lemon Law.

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